Books

Religious violence in the media

It is a fact that religious violence has been present in the world history in different cultures. With Peacemaking and Religious Violence due for publication this June, we have decided to take a look at current events showing how religion is still one of the main triggers of serious conflicts.

The BBC News informs that Egyptian newspapers have published angry comments on the Muslim-Christians clashes in recent days in Egypt. More than 180 people were wounded in clashes on Saturday 7th of May after conservative Muslims attacked a Coptic church in the Imbaba area.

Tariq Ramadan of The Guardian asserts that Muslim majority countries will soon no longer be defined by their relationships with the West after bin Laden’s death.

Religion has also caused riots after the Nigerian election results. Daniel Howden, Africa Correspondent of The Independent, explains what has been happening as a result of the last election in April. “However, religious divisions stirred during campaigning have come quickly to the fore. Witnesses described seeing charred corpses and burning buildings on the approach to Kaduna, the northern city and former seat of British rule. Similar scenes were reported in the northern states of Zamfara, Kano and Katsina”.

Jacket imageWith Peacemaking and Religious Violence, Johnson sees the history of religious violence in Christianity as reflecting the alliance of Church and civil government prevalent during the Constantinian era in the West and still characteristic of most non-Western political-religious relations today. In some cases the wars were intra-Christian conflicts; in others the enemies were Muslim. All five of the thinkers he discusses in this book sought to reclaim the peace mandate of Jesus in their response to the religious violence of their own eras, and in the epilogue, he recounts some intriguing Christian responses to religious violence in our own century.

To purchase a copy or to find out more about the book

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